Jane Rowe arrived in New Zealand with her husband Henry, in January 1843, on board the Essex. They lived for about three years in the settlement before returning to England. In 1859, they came once more to New Zealand and lived in Bell Block.
The papers consist of letters written by Jane Rowe to her father-in-law, Capt Rowe; papers relating to Dr T. E. Rawson and a copy of a memo from Halse to Mrs Kyngdon regarding finance.
Department
Archives
Classification
Production Date
1847-1872
1840-1849
1850-1859
1860-1869
1870-1879

Archive Contents

  Part 1

Engraving of Hua Blockhouse c1860

  Part 2

Engraving of the Waiwakaiho Bridge, Taranaki New Zealand plus envelope addressed Mrs Alfred Rowe Bell Block 1941 - 1942 ; newspaper clipping Wrestling in Arcady, Bell Block circa 1842 ; photograph inscribed on reverse Bell Block school boy.

  Part 3

Letters. Written by Jane Rowe to her father-in-law, Capt Rowe c1860.

  Part 4

Transcript of letters.

  Part 5

Letter to Jame Rowe from Mary Ann Carrington plus transcript. 1847

  Part 6

Memo from Mr Halse to Mrs Kingdon re payment from Natives Mori and Tamihana. 1856

  Part 7

Letter. To Dr T. E. Rawson from the Acting Native Secretary re typhus fever amongst natives of the Thames District. Nov. 1862

  Part 8

Letter. To Dr T. E. Rawson from the Acting Native Secretary re report on the state of health of the natives of the Thames District. Dec. 1862

  Part 9

Land script. (3) Transfer of land in New Plymouth from Henry Halse to William Halse. 11 Nov. 1851

  Part 10

Letter. To T. E. Rawson from the New Zealand branch Australian Mutual Provident Society re life insurance. 1872

  Part 11

List of property burned and plundered by the rebel Maories, belonging to T. E. Rawson, Tataraimaka, Taranaki

  Part 12

Schedule of title deeds and writings relating to propety belonging to Charles Edward Rawson motrgaged to Henry Govett. 1851 - 1857

  Part 13

CD-R containing 12 TIFF scans of items 7, 8, 10, 11 and 12.

Created 5 November 2007

Accession No
ARC2002-523

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