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Sante (Gulabhbhai) was born in India in 1939 and describes her early life growing up in India. After an arranged marriage at 15 years of age she came to live in New Zealand with her husband (Singi) and describes her experiences of living in a different culture.
Singi (Gulabhbhai) was born in Marton, his parents having emigrated in the early 1920's. He moved to New Plymouth at the age of ten. They talk of working life and children, the Taranaki Indian Association, Auckland Fijian Indian Association and Surf Life Saving.
Recorded 25 May 1993
Interviewer: Joy Peckham
Restrictions: none
Accession No
ARC2005-173

Name/Title
Oral history. Elizabeth Davies (nee Brown) was born in Christchurch in 1936. Trained as a Karitane nurse, Davies talks of her education and life of a student. She discusses her career working with mothers and new born babies and her work as a mobile Karitane nurse, covering the areas of Stratford, Eltham and Kaponga.
Recorded: 25 November 1995
Interviewer: Margaret Fox
Abstraction: Floss Lambert
Restrictions: None
Accession No
ARC2005-278

Personal papers for James Prestidge of Eltham. Includes a Post Office War Gratuity pass book, a certificate of enrolment for the General Reserve under National Service Emergency Regulations, 1940, a 1943 diary and notepad used as journals during active service in the Pacific.
Accession No
ARC2009-177

Name/Title
Mary Hirst arrived with her parents in New Plymouth on the ship Gwalior in 1852. They settled in New Plymouth. Mary married William Devenish, 25 Nov 1855. The diary covers a period of three months from October to December 1854 and includes descriptions of daily farming activities including some detailed interaction with local Maori.
Accession No
ARC2001-51

Name/Title
Maria came to New Zealand in 1859 on the ship Eclipse as governess to the family of the Rev. H. H. Brown, a clergyman at Omata, New Plymouth. In 1860 she was evacuated to Nelson, and shortly afterwards dismissed from the Brown's service. Unable to pay her fare back to England, she reluctantly worked as governess to Lulu Eyes, the daughter of one of the wealthiest men in the province. Maria stayed with the Eyes family at Wairau for one year, she returned to England in February 1862.
In these copies of her letters addressed to her sister Elizabeth Hall she describes the voyage out on the Eclipse, 1858-1859, and her first impressions of New Plymouth and its inhabitants and her stay in Nelson. Her comments on colonial society are detailed and perceptive.
Accession No
ARC2002-142

Oral history. Alison Robinson talks to Roy and June Schneller December 27th 1991. Topics covered include the Schneller family history, the accidental death of Christian Schneller, the Whiting family, farming, school days, families in the district, early memories of meeting with Maori, staff at the dairy factory, the Home Guard and the E.P.S. ( Emergency Precaution Scheme ), ragwort, manpower shortages.
Part of a collection of interviews recording the history of the Finnerty Road / Lowgarth district.
An edited transcript has been made. Sound quality variable.
Accession No
ARC2002-384

Oral history. June was born near Arundel in Sussex, England in 1917and describes her early life growing up in England, experiences during the Second World War, West Africa, Singapore and emigration to New Zealand in 1961. For many years June was involved with Otaki Health Camp and describes her involvement. She was also involved with Save the Children and the Red Cross.
Recorded: 15 March 1993 Interviewer: Joy Peckham
Accession No
ARC2004-1762

Name/Title
Oral history. Born in County Durham, England in 1919, Amy describes growing up in England, her early life nursing in Sheffield during the Second World War and meeting her husband, Peter. She emigrated to New Zealand to be with her husband in 1944 on the ship, Port Phillip. Before coming to New Zealand Amy did not realise Peter was a Maori and describes meeting her husband's family around Wanganui and Taranaki and settling into life in New Zealand. Amy speaks about her husband and his life running his own business as a hairdresser, and her work as a manageress at Bev Lynn. Amy was involved with the War Brides club and Manchester Unity.
Recorded: 29 March 1993 Interviewer: Joy Peckham
Accession No
ARC2004-1764

Oral history. Born 1920 at Hastings, Sussex Tony talks of his war experiences in Burma and his work in an electrical repair unit. Came to New Zealand and settled in New Plymouth working for the New Plymouth City Council. Talks also of his hobbies.
Recorded: 10 January 1994 Interviewer: J Peckham
Abstraction: J Peckham
Restrictions: none
Accession No
ARC2007-10

Name/Title
Oral history. Alison Robinson talks to Phil Martin regarding the Lowgarth District and Finnerty Road. January 8 1992. Phil talks of childhood memories, Home Guard and WWII, home made wine, metal for roading, quarries, the Lowgarth Dairy Co., Ernie Pawson ( water diviner ).
Part of a collection of interviews recording the history of the Finnerty Road / Lowgarth district.
An edited transcription is available.
Accession No
ARC2002-388

Name/Title
George talks about his time at Tarata, the effects of the Depression on farming, etc. Life with the Home Guard at Tarata and his dealings with the pig population.
Recorded: 10 May 1995
Interviewer: Mary Donald
Accession No
ARC2003-1248

Oral history. Born at Napier, Jack Moller at the age of 94, recalls his war service during World War One at Gallipoli and his return to New Zealand to become manager of the Riverlea branch of the Kaponga Dairy Company and later the Hawera and Tawhiti Dairy Companies before joining the Maori Affairs Department in 1956. Describes the flu epidemic of 1918. His grand-daughter Lorraine Moller, marathon runner is also mentioned. Jack died July 9 1991 at the age of 99 years.
Length: 61 minutes
Date: 18 February 1985
Place: 3 Collins Street, Hawera
Interviewer: Janet Old
Accession No
ARC2004-1733

Name/Title
Oral history. Marjory Dora Macartney (nee Riley) was born in England on 4 November 1920. She describes her experiences of overseas service during World War II. Macartney served as a WAAF in Ceylon, where she met and married her husband Robert (Bob), a New Zealander. After the war, they returned to New Zealand, arriving and living in Christchurch before moving to Wanganui. The Macartney's later retired to New Plymouth.
Recorded: 17 February 1998
Interviewer: Mary Donald
Abstraction: Floss Lambert
Restrictions: To be advised of any use (release date 2010)
Accession No
ARC2005-311

Name/Title
May was the daughter of Henry and Alice (nee Duffill) Lloyd. lived on the Patiki Road before moving to Manaia. In 'Maranui' Manaia, she writes of her childhood memories in Manaia. She was 80 years old at the time of writing and while the document is not dated, she refers to the Manaia centennial celebrations in 1982.
The reminiscences are arranged in a series of chapters with headings such as 'family'; Manaia Municipal Brass Band; Boxthorn; School Days; Miss Loudon; We become Keepers of the Bees; the Climate; Granny; Troubled Times, World War I, 1914-1918; Town Cows of Manaia; Parihaka; Kapuni beach; Our Church (Methodist); sport; Paddy McKeown; The Patterson Family; Haymaking; More People; Manaia Golf Club; Boxthorn; Manaia Centennial Celebrations.
Accession No
ARC2002-76

Name/Title
Josiah Flight was born in Devonshire in 1800 and came to New Zealand on the Timandra in 1842 with his wife Sarah Anne and child Anne (Annie). His two younger daughters Sarah and Katie were born in New Plymouth. Josiah was one of the first Justices of the Peace and was appointed Resident Magistrate and Coroner of the district in 1852. He is recorded as having land in Weekstown (now known as Strandon) on the corner of Nobs Line and Devon Road and later they were one of the first families to settle in the Bell Block area, near the Mangaoraka Stream.
The Flight family are credited with introducing the first sheep and European fruit to the new settlement.
The papers include two of Anne Flight's journals, June-July 1838 and Oct 1841-Oct 1842, Sarah Flight's journal, April 1862-March 1863, correspondence between various members of the family and fellow settlers, and genealogical notes.
Accession No
ARC2002-135

Emily Harris, artist and teacher, arrived in New Plymouth in 1841 in the ship William Bryan with her parents, Edwin and Sarah (nee Hill), and brother and sister. The family ran schools in New Plymouth before moving to Nelson about 1860. In 1890 some of her paintings were issued in three parts of twelve plates each, 'New Zealand Flowers', 'New Zealand Berries' and 'New Zealand Ferns'.
The collection comprises letters to various members of the family (1860-1863), letters from her mother (1841) and Angus Dobson (1844) and a scrapbook with publications and original plant sketches. Her diaries (1885-1886) contain notes on social life and affairs in Nelson, on her work as an artist, and a visit to New Plymouth in 1890. A journal contains copies of correspondence for 1888.
Accession No
ARC2002-190

Name/Title
Joe Dravitski recalls his parents, Grandmother Kuklinski and other Polish families. Life and school at Ratapiko. The influenza epidemic, bush fires and life in the Home Guard. Bartering and trading for goods at Inglewood. Joe was a member of the War Memorial Hall Committee (Lake Mangamahoe).
Abstraction: Floss Lambert / Pam Murdock
Restrictions: none
Accession No
ARC2004-232

Name/Title
Oral history. Nesta Andrews was born in England in 1917 and the family came to New Zealand on the ship the "Ruahine." During World War II, Nesta worked as a herd tester; travelling to farms on a horse and cart to tests herds in Motunui and Eltham. This interview is part of a series of four which focuses on women doing men's work during WWII.
Recorded 30 January 1993
Interviewer: Connor, Jo
Abstraction: Florinda Lambert
Restrictions: None
Accession No
ARC2005-287

Name/Title
This recording was made at St. James Hall, Lawry Street, New Plymouth at the Women's Division of Federated Farmers, North Taranaki Province, function to mark Women's Suffrage Year, entitled "Women's Achievements Throughout The Years".The theme for the day was "Women on the Land". This was held with the support of the 1993 Suffrage Centennial Year Trust Whakatu Wahine in asssociation with the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board.
Joyce Crowley speaks of her involvement in the early days of the New Zealand Land Army, the difficulties encountered, the anti-woman attitude and the eventual acceptance of women. She also includes snippets from her local body and political invovement.
Accession No
ARC2008-139
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