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Name/Title
Type 2b (Duff). The stone type borders between Argillite and Greywacke with some areas of fine texture and other areas of more grainy quality. Grey green in overall colour with some thin dark streaks and bands of colour. the majority of surface is smooth. There are multiple flaking scars which are mostly concentrated near the edges though one large one is situated in the middle underblade area (major curved cutting edge side). More recent chips are evident on the cutting edge, one large chip on one corner of the cutting edge. Surface scratches evident from manufacture.
Accession No
PA2016.027

Name/Title
Easily recognisable overall shape with common appearance and proportions similar to the average stone pounder. Unusual diamond / pentagonal reke (handle knob) that is possibly the beginning of a face. No defined rebate area to denote the transition between the handle and body area. Four raised ridges running lengthways
Spots of blue, white and red paint on surface
Accession No
PA2016.025

Plain muka body with taniko borders on three edges (paepaeroa) and neck edge finished in blue and red wool. Top edge of broad taniko band along bottom is decorated with a twist of blue and red wool. Kaupapa worked in horizontal rows of whenu; 7 whenu to 1 cm. Ara spaced at 7mm intervals.
Accession No
PA2004.144

Name/Title
Entire cloak made from toi (leaf from a mountain cabbage tree). Kaupapa worked in horizontal rows of whatu aho tahi (patahi). Three whenu to every 10mm. Ara unevenly spaced - averaging 20mm intervals. Ponga fibres approximately 140mm in length have been folded in half and woven like a feather into the kaupapa every fourth whenu on alternative rows (see notes).
Accession No
A79.957

Name/Title
Epa
Consists of a mass of serpentine bodies with one large full face at the top and two smaller heads, both in side profile, near the centre of the epa. One of these heads is upside down and has a very pointed forehead. The other head which is in side profile appears to have no forehead. The body of the main female figure joins the head at the left side. The forehead of this main figure is very pointed. One arm passes through the lower jaw while the other passes under the lower body with the hand resting on the chest near the lower one. The leg passes through the eyebrow of the lower figure. The figure which is upside down has its arms around the arm of the main figure and its leg around the main figures neck. The other figure links arms with another body which has no head. No leg is shown but there is a leg on the headless body with the foot resting on the forehead of the inverted figure. Decoration occurs on the lower part of the figures bodies (pakati and haehae). Notching is used around the mouths. Puwerewere is found on the brows and lips of the figures. There is very little background decoration but where it does occur it is matakupenga. Two lashing holes are present along the top of the epa with two on the left side and two on the right side. A recess has been cut along the angled edge. The epa would fit on the left side of a pataka. Carving is deep.
Accession No
A77.330

Name/Title
Epa
Consists of five figures. Faces of two are frontal while the other three are in side profile. Two small figures at the base on the right side have entwined necks and their two arms are linked in a semi-circle formed by their bodies. Both have the other arm and hand in their mouths. Both have pointed foreheads. The lower part of their bodies are not present. Above these figures is another serpentine figure which has one arm passing through the lower jaw with the hand resting on the chest. The other arm passes under the lower body coming up just in front of the hip with the fingers resting on the chest. Only the top of one leg is shown. A strip along the entire length of the left side is missing which would have presumably had the rest of the other two figures carved on it. The top figure on this side is in side profile. Again one hand is to the mouth with the other arm to the side with the hand resting on the body. The leg appears to pass through the brow of the lower full face figure coming up again with the toes resting on the vulva which is in side profile. For the lower figure on the left side only half the face is present and a small part of the body is present. Only one upper arm is depicted. Background decoration where it occurs is matakupenga. Puwerewere is used on the brows and lips of the figures. Three lashing holes are present on the left side while two are present along the angled top. There is a recess along the angled edge. This epa would fit on the right side of a pataka. Thought to have been carved by Tuiti-moeroa (Houston 1958a:166). Carving is deep.
Accession No
A77.329

Name/Title
Consists of two frontal female figures, one on top of the other. The top figure has one arm through its mouth with the other arm at its side with the hand resting on its knee. One leg passes through the lower figures eyebrow. The other leg is at its side with the foot resting on the lower figures peaked forehead. The lower figure also has one arm through its lower jaw while the other arm is linked with its leg. The legs are drawn up underneath the vulva. The two eye pegs on the lower figure have double spirals carved on them. A small amount of background decoration is present on the right side of the maihi between the lower body of the top figure and the head of the lower figure. It consists of broad crescent designs incorporating puwerewere, haehae and raumoa which has notching along parts of it. Maihi is from the right side of the pataka. Carving is moderately deep. In the past this piece has been classified as an epa. However, there are several points which suggest that it is in fact a maihi. First there is a flaring near the angled end. This occurs on no other epa. Secondly there is the "narrowness" of this piece especially when its length is taken into account. Finally there is "free" space at the base of the artefact. All other known epa are carved right to the bottom edge of the base. These features plus the form of carving, being neither deep nor shallow, in comparison with the epa, suggest that this piece is a maihi.
Accession No
A71.200
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