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View of the White Cliffs from a high vantage point. Foliage and tree stumps in foreground. Mount Taranaki pictured in the background.
Accession No
A66.573

The colours, or standards, of the Taranaki Militia and Volunteers. The colours feature two flags and the British Crown.
Accession No
A66.725

Taranaki Regiment Colours "Primus in Armis", 1916-18. Presented by Governor General Viscount Galway in a ceremony at Pukekura Park, New Plymouth, on 22 March 1936.
Accession No
A66.789

Colours of the Taranaki Rifle Volunteers. Colours have the words "Taranaki Volunteers / Waireka" in the centre. The colours were presented at a parade on Poverty Flat (now the site of Central School) on 25 June 1861.
Accession No
A66.790

Small steel engraving showing the Bell Block Stockade in the middleground with surrounding outposts. Mt Taranaki/Egmont in background. Four individuals are located lower left of the hill.
Accession No
A77.781

Head and shoulder portrait of Second Lieutenant F.W. Watson. He is wearing military uniform. Plain background. Watson died in WWI.
Accession No
A83.003

Painting depicting a pilot in a black military aircraft. The bottom of the aircraft shows a string of white numbers and letters that refer to the code printed into a piece of metal retrieved from an American missile dropped on a residential area of Baghdad, Iraq, in March 2003. The missile killed dozens of civilians. The body of the aircraft also features a symbol in a yellow circle, which is Roger Morris' symbol for "the corporate fascist". The red dot refers to a sniper's laser dot and the words "HIT HERE" to targets attacked by the US military. One of the red dots is printed onto the silhouette of a figure. The background of the print is vivid orange. The print is from Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series, which explores differing version of truth surrounding the September 11, 2001 'terror attacks' in the United States of America.
Accession No
PA2012.031

"Post 9/11 Landscape" highlights the way the media and government authorities mediate and control our view of world events. The painting depicts a figure standing next to one of the World Trade Centre towers. The figure has five white stripes on its body and is wearing a helmet. It is a symbol of authority. Four triangle shapes depicted in black and white in the sky represent aeroplanes and/or bombs. The landscape and sky areas of the painting are made up of blue, orange, red, white, purple, yellow and brown dots and dashes. They allude to the way our view of the world is constructed from pixelated newspaper and television images of international events. It also references how the level of filtering, mediation and control of information by Western media and governments has increased after the 11 September 2001 'terror attacks' on the United States of America.
Accession No
PA2012.034

Name/Title
Artwork based on a graphic produced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the United States of America to explain how the World Trade Centre towers fell without the aid of explosives. The artwork depicts one of the World Trade Centre towers with lines emanating from the centre of the tower, indicating the tower's core strengthening columns. An aeroplane is pictured on the left of the image prior to impact. Roger Morris considers NIST's explanation of the towers' collapse to be "creationist", overlooking other factors in the buildings' collapse.
Accession No
PA2012.037

Artwork of printed and painted elements against a black background. The upper half of the work features the white shape of a World War II bomber aircraft. The words "santa" and "HIT" are written on the bomber. Beneath the bomber to the left is a black, white and red oil drum. The red dot on the drum's lid refers to a sniper's laser dot. The bottom half of the painting features equations and a diagram of an engine painted in white. A grid of squares, outlined in bright colours, has been printed over the top of this area. The text of the found object Morris has used as the base for the work is discernible behind the background layer of black paint. The artwork's imagery reflects Morris' search for icons and images that can give voice and shape to the contemporary era. The print is part of Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series, which explores differing version of truth surrounding the September 11, 2001 'terror attacks' in the United States of America.
Accession No
PA2012.039

Collage highlighting what Roger Morris sees as the "comic book nature" of the events that took place on 11 September 2001 in the United States of America. The collage is made up of both readymade elements and handmade elements. It features two comic book covers, one of "Superboy" and one of "Captain America and the Falcon". The "Superboy" cover has been cut up and a page of text, including a photograph of George W. Bush, has been inserted underneath so it appears as if Bush's face features on the magazine cover. Part of another comic strip is adhered to the right hand edge of the artwork. Two hand painted depictions of clowns are glued to the centre of the collage. Morris describes these faces as being "the face of madness". They both have large red noses and red smiles. A composite image of an action figure's head and George W. Bush's face, created by Morris in Photoshop, is glued to the left hand side of the artwork. It is glued onto another collage element that features two hand drawn faces and black ink. Beneath, a figure holding a gun has been printed in black paint. Along the lower horizontal edge, a frieze featuring seven images of an aeroplane flying into one of the World Trade Centre towers has been glued down. The words "THe DAY THE WAr came" are handwritten beneath it.
Accession No
PA2012.040

Woodcut print of a part of an engine printed in black paint. Text reading "TOO /LATE / utility R. was here. OEO CALLING" is printed on the bottom right hand corner of the artwork. The print is part of Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series, which explores differing versions of truth surrounding the September 11, 2001 'terror attacks' in the United States of America.
Accession No
PA2012.041

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series that features four elements relating to the Global War on Terror. The top element is a hand drawn engine block, referring to 'the might of the military machine'. The next is a silhouette of a tank. The third is a stylised figure. The fourth is the word "OIL". The artwork has been made on the back of a proof poster for the TOWER New Zealand Youth Choir.
Accession No
PA2012.042

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series. The 'sky' area features a stencil of Neil Armstrong in the lunar lander. Below is a standing figure. It has a sniper's red dot trained on its body.
Accession No
PA2012.043

Name/Title
Collage of etching ink on exposed photographic paper and a stenciled element. A face of dark blue and black is silhouetted against a grey background. A stencil of numbers and algorithms covered in thick white ink obscures part of the face. The featureless face stands for the faceless casualties of war and was inspired by photographs taken of victims of the Khmer Rouge. The title of the artwork 'Illuminate Us' is inscribed at the base of the face and is a play on Illuminati and the United States of America.
Accession No
PA2012.044

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Tales of the New Dominion' series that evokes the coming of a new war. The composition is broken into two halves. The lower portion shows white dabs of paint on white cardboard. The top half depicts a black missile shape and four red triangles, which represent either aeroplanes or bombs, targeting the tall buildings of a city on the left of the image. The top portion of the artwork is rendered in greys and black.
Accession No
PA2012.045

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series that refers to the faceless civilian victims of war. The artwork is made up of four panels of found images glued to a black cardboard support. Morris has painted over the images in black etching ink to create faceless head and shoulder 'portraits'. The two panels on the left of the image feature the words "HERE" painted in red paint. The next panel has a collage element and a white aeroplane obscuring the head of the figure beneath. The word "HIT" is printed in white paint on the panel. The panel on the right features scrawled words/patterns in white ink. Beneath the four panels is a string of white ink numbers and letters that refer to the code printed into a piece of metal retrieved from an American missile dropped on a residential area of Baghdad, Iraq, in March 2003. The missile killed dozens of civilians.
Accession No
PA2012.048

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series that evokes the anonymous casualties of war. The artwork is made up of twelve panels that feature faceless heads, depicted in such a way as to make them virtually indistinguishable from each other. They are rendered in blacks and greys. The artwork was inspired by the casualties of war remembered by various war memorials around the world. Morris sees them not only as dead, but also hopeful and humorous.
Accession No
PA2012.052

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series that evokes the anonymous casualties of war. An image of a faceless head - rendered in white, black and grey - is adhered to a piece of plastic that has been cut into the shape of a television/table. The numbers "2 2 1 69 4 415" are stamped in white into the bottom of the image. The numbers are random. The artwork was inspired by the casualties of war remembered by various war memorials around the world. Morris sees the face not only as dead, but also hopeful and humorous.
Accession No
PA2012.054

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series that evokes the anonymous casualties of war. An image of a faceless head - rendered in white, black and grey - is adhered to a piece of plastic that has been cut into the shape of a television/table. The numbers "4 5 223 9" are stamped in white into the bottom of the image. The numbers are random. The artwork was inspired by the casualties of war remembered by various war memorials around the world. Morris sees the face not only as dead, but also hopeful and humorous.
Accession No
PA2012.055

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series that evokes the anonymous casualties of war. An image of a faceless head - rendered in white, black and grey - is adhered to a piece of plastic that has been cut into the shape of a television/table. The numbers "00 1 3197 5 67" are stamped in white into the bottom of the image. The numbers are random. The artwork was inspired by the casualties of war remembered by various war memorials around the world. Morris sees the face not only as dead, but also hopeful and humorous.
Accession No
PA2012.056

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series that evokes the anonymous casualties of war. An image of a faceless head - rendered in white, black and grey - is adhered to a piece of plastic that has been cut into the shape of a television/table. The numbers "07 3 9 94" are stamped in white into the bottom of the image. The numbers are random. The artwork was inspired by the casualties of war remembered by various war memorials around the world. Morris sees the face not only as dead, but also hopeful and humorous.
Accession No
PA2012.057

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series that evokes the anonymous casualties of war. An image of a faceless head - rendered in white, black and grey - is adhered to a piece of plastic that has been cut into the shape of a television/table. The numbers "4 37 790" are stamped in white into the bottom of the image. The numbers are random. The artwork was inspired by the casualties of war remembered by various war memorials around the world. Morris sees the face not only as dead, but also hopeful and humorous.
Accession No
PA2012.058

Artwork of etching ink on photographic paper. The upper part of the artwork depicts an aeroplane flying through a grainy sky. The lower part shows a lone figure struggling through a dusty landscape.
Accession No
PA2012.061

Artwork from Roger Morris' 'Enduring Freedom' series depicting ten stencilled jigsaw puzzle shapes in red ink. The shapes are indicative of human figures. They are set into white dots that have pinky red edges. The dots are placed against a black background. Both the right hand and left hand vertical edges of the paper feature pinky red lines.
Accession No
PA2012.062
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