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Watercolour depicting a Mt. Egmont Buttercup in bud and blossom. The background shows a mountain ridge with traces of snow and tussock vegetation.
Accession No
A85.198

View of Marsland Hill from the north west with full moon rising in the south east. Barracks on top of hill with steps curving down and towards foreground. Charles Brown's grave in left foreground.

Marsland Hill provided the single most important European military establishment of the Taranaki Wars. First occupied in 1855, it provided the headquarters for Imperial troops and local forces in Taranaki until the Armed Constabulary period of the 1870s and 1880s. The site was a former pa, Pukaka, and to provide a sufficient platform for the barracks and stockade, twelve metres had to be removed from the top. The iron clad barrack buildings which were erected on top of the hill arrived from Melbourne on the "Alexander" in June 1855. Marsland Hill was at the centre of an extensive signaling system throughout the First Taranaki War and for part of the second war. Three or four canvas wicker balls were raised or lowered on the yards of a signaling mast. At its greatest extent the signaling system reached the Waitara River to the north and St George's Redoubt in the Tataraimaka Block to the south.
Accession No
A75.434

Ink and watercolour sketch of the Bank of New Zealand building in Waitara. The building is rendered in green with grey columns and a large red door, with the outlines and details sketched loosely in black ink. The building was built in 1876 and demolished in the 1960s.
Accession No
A66.692

White weatherboard house with red roof and verandah. Vegetation around house.
Accession No
A66.613

Picture of chapel with people entering through door. Originally erected in Mangorei Road by settler-farmer Zaccheus William Wells, who used to preach at the chapel. It was later used as the chapel at Rangiatea.
Accession No
A66.582

Exterior view of the Standish homestead, known as Maratahu. The house was built in 1843 by Thomas Standish, the father of Arthur Standish (first Mayor of New Plymouth).
Accession No
A66.579

View of white weatherboard house with red roof. House is surrounded by trees and shrubs. Wooden fence in foreground.
Accession No
A66.578

View of convent with four trees and foliage in foreground. The convent was built in 1883 and opened in 1884 by the Archbishop Redwood.
Accession No
A66.512

Wooden house with red roof. White wooden fence around front of property. Trees and shrubs also pictured.
Accession No
A66.231

Wooden house set amongst shrubs and tall trees.
Accession No
A66.207

Exterior of residential house at 71 Powderham Street, New Plymouth. The house was built in 1870 for Thomas Humphries, then the Chief Surveyor (late Surveyor General).
Accession No
A65.925

View of weatherboard house with red roof at night. Picket fence around the front of the property. Tall trees visible on the right hand side of the painting.
Accession No
A65.924

Depicts "Bonithon", residence of James Cragg Sharland, a friend of the artist. The main house, which was built during the 1850s and located on Bonithon Avenue (New Plymouth), is visible to the left middleground. To the right foreground are the original stables, sheds and gardeners cottage. The Grey Institute is located at the extreme right. Watercolour has been attributed to John Gully.
Accession No
A65.893
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