filters
More Options
Shortlist
  •   Add All to Shortlist
A pass for the Urenui Native Contingent dated 21/10/1879 and signed by Major Stapp
Accession No
ARC2001-4

Written in a conversational style, H W Insull relates the story of Reverand Henry Handley Brown's theological training in England, the leasing of land 'Brookwood' at Omata, the Battle at Waireka and how Brown's house was awarded 'sanctory' status by Maori, Brown's role in the wreck of the Lord Worsley.
Accession No
ARC2001-72

Name/Title
Written by E.R. Andrews, the paper was prepared and read to a meeting of the New Plymouth Historical Society on 10 December 1945.
Ted Andrews gives an introduction to Maori history to the Huirangi area including Pukerangiora before describing event 1860 - 1864 with the battle of Te Kohia, Puketakauere, Matarikoriko, Te Arei and Sentry Hill.
Accession No
ARC2001-79

An essay written by Gordon Gavin includes a brief background to the Messenger family's lifestyle in England followed by more detailed information on their arrival in Taranaki 1853 and life in Omata and Pukearuhe. Annotated by Fred Butler.
Accession No
ARC2001-91

Name/Title
Copies of three letters to Elizabeth Mellors who was the sister of Dr T. E. Rawson and aunt to Charles E. Rawson, includes comments about the events in New Plymouth in 1861 and 1862. Letters copied by Elsie Holmes (nee Rawson) 1930. Additional correspondence between various members of the Rawson family, mainly regarding family history.
Accession No
ARC2001-99

Name/Title
Either an essay or speech notes written by Miss A. J. Page, possibly for delivery to a New Plymouth Historical Society meeting.
The writer takes a look at redoubts and stockades in the New Plymouth / Waitara area etc.
Accession No
ARC2001-102

Name/Title
In this typescript C.J. Hoskin relates the story of Wereroa Pa and the effects of land confiscations in South Taranaki. Written in a style of interpretation which was common in the 1940s and 50s.
Accession No
ARC2001-118

Speech notes on the history of Waitara giving two difference accounts - one from Ben Wells and the other 'based in Maori legends'.H.L. Wallace balances written accounts against oral traditions given to him by Mr Witten-Hannah
Accession No
ARC2001-103

A paper prepared and read by Mr B. A. Norman at the meeting of the New Plymouth Historical Society on Sept 10 1945.
The paper describes the memorial and tells the story of the battle at Mahoetahi where Imperial and Colonial troops engaged with Maori, primarily from the Waikato.
Accession No
ARC2001-101

Name/Title
William Newland 1839-1919, was two years old when the Newland family came to New Zealand on the ship Amelia Thompson in 1841. Raised in New Plymouth, he joined the militia and became a lieutenant in the Patea Bushrangers. He later took up farming in the Wairoa and Patea areas. He died on the 21 April 1919 and is buried in the Te Henui Cemetery, New Plymouth.
The reminiscences give an account of the land wars. They are separated into various sections, J. Stronge in biographical notes on the reverse of a copy of the transcript of the Siege of Pipiriki, surmises that the reminiscences were transcribed by a relative of Captain Newland, as some of the narrative is in the first person and some in the third person.
Accession No
ARC2001-121

Name/Title
A transcript of his diary entries beginning 9th June 1868 and ceasing on the 3rd January 1869 and describe daily events both as farmer and as a volunteer in the colonial force.
Accession No
ARC2001-123

Name/Title
McDonnell, Thomas, 1832-1899. Thomas McDonnell, eldest son of Thomas McDonnell Senior was born in the Philippines and arrived in NZ as a young child. The McDonnell family resided in Hareka where there owned a timber mill, supplying spars to HM ships. Thomas Junior joined the Colonial force in 1865 and embarked on a military career. He was active service at Mauku, Drury, Weraroa and Pipiriki. He was given command of the 'protecting forces' in Taranaki but his negotiations with Ngatiruanui and Tangahoe were unsuccessful. In April 1866, he was promoted Lieutenant Colonel and given the command of the Native Contingent, operating against Titokowaru and his Hauhau warriors. In July 1868 McDonnell was promoted to the rank of Inspector of the Armed Constabulary but with failure at Te Ngutu o te manu, he resigned his command and served under his successor, Colonel Whitmore. He was later called to assist in operations against Te Kooti and was awarded the New Zealand Cross in 1886.Thomas Junior later became a land agent in Wanganui.
These copies of letters consist mainly of inward correspondence relating to military matters but there are also three earlier letters from his father Thomas McDonnell Senior. A list of newspaper references in albums of cuttings compiled by Thomas McDonnell is included.
Accession No
ARC2001-127

Ordained by the Bishop of Lincoln in 1837, In 1859, the Rev Henry Handley Brown with his wife Sophia and their eleven children came to New Plymouth on board the ship 'Eclipse'. With the exception of two sons the family went to Nelson during the land wars. He and his wife settled at Omata where he became resident clergy, attached to St Mary's church. He was also itinerant vicar for the area. He developed a close relationship with the Maori community and in March 1860, at the time of the battle at Waireka, the Maori people protected his family, home and property by posting a panui on the gate to his residence.
The papers include documents relating to his life in the church, personal papers and the notice pinned to his gate in March 1860 protecting him and his family during the Battle of Waireka.
Accession No
ARC2001-131

Two diaries written by Robert Clinton Hughes, 20 February 1860 to 9 February 1861 and 10 February to 30 June 1861. The diaries where written while Hughes was attending Beardsworth's School in New Plymouth and during the events of the First Taranaki War. His diaries give an impression of what it was like to live in New Plymouth during this period, with vivid accounts of the overcrowding caused by settlers coming in from the outlying areas and families seeking safety at the barracks on Marsland Hill.
A full transcription of both diaries is available.
Accession No
ARC2001-140

Constantine Augustus Dillon was born in September 1813, the fourth son of the 13th Viscount Henry Augustus Dillon. Before his emigration to New Zealand in 1842, he served in the Royal Navy, the 7th Dragoon Guards and the 17th Lancers. He also served as Aide-de-Camp to Lord Durham, Governor-General of Canada and to Lord Ebrington, the Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland.
In February 1842 he married Frances Dorothy Story, daughter of Philip and Lydia Story. He and his wife then emigrated to New Zealand, arriving on the 7th of November on the ship George Fyfe. They settled in Nelson.
In 1843 he became a magistrate and was also responsible for the drilling of the Nelson Volunteers after the Wairau skirmish. During the years up to his death, he served as Military and Civil Secretary to Governor Grey in Auckland 1848-51, and then as Commissioner of Crown Lands and Land Claims in Nelson.
He died in 1853 as a result of drowning.
These typescript copies of letters written by Frances and Constantine Dillon describe their experiences in New Zealand between the years of 1842-1853.
Accession No
ARC2001-138

Name/Title
A collection of typed transcripts of letters from or about Whiteley, 1833, 1839, 1894; from his son-in-law Dr Thomas Edward Rawson, 1861-1862; an extract from 'London Society' by Louisa M. Rawson; 'Reminiscences of the Maori Wars 1860', 1894.
Accession No
ARC2001-147

Name/Title
Born at Eddingley, Kneesall, Nottinghamshire, Whiteley cane to New Zealand in 1832 to join the Wesleyan Mission Society's station at Hokianga. In 1834 he went to establish a mission at Kawhia, Waikato, where, after one brief interlude when the station closed, he worked with great influence and mana among the Maoris until 1855. In 1856 he went to Taranaki where he was in charge of the Grey Educational Institution at Ngamotu, built a native chapel at Kawau pa, New Plymouth, and then at Henui. As an unsalaried Commissioner of Native Lands, he again used his influence in the Land Wars, successfully, and was engaged in ministering to Maoris when he was ambushed and killed at White Cliffs, near Waitara, during the Hauhau rising.
The collection includes inwards correspondence from H.R. Richmond, 1868; J. Buller, 1859 and Josiah Flight, 1849.
Accession No
ARC2001-146

Name/Title
The papers include Parris' commissions, various letters concerning his various appointments in the Provincial Government and New Zealand Militia, between the years 1857-1875, promotions and new appointments, notes and newspaper clippings relating to his life in Taranaki.
Accession No
ARC2001-189

Name/Title
A Form II school project titled 'Early Taranaki'. The project is a number of lined sheets pasted into a brown paper cover. Illustrated by David Scott with a view of the mountain and written in pen. Title of chapters are : Early settlers to Taranaki; When Te Whiti Came to Town; When War Came to New Plymouth;
Accession No
ARC2001-250

Garrison orders issued by Col. Warre and read out at a full parade of troops at New Plymouth 10 April 1864. It reports on investigations into the battle at Ahuahu at which Capt Lloyd, Private Jeremiah Dooley, George Sadler, all of the 57th Regt and Corporal H Banks, Privates James Nagel and H Bartley and John Gallager were killed.
The orders reprimand other soldiers who were in the area at the time and stops short of accusing them of cowardice.
The order consist of three sheets of paper and the fourth item is a label which was in the original frame giving a title for the order and advising that it was presented by W F Gordon. This is written in Gordon's hand.
Accession No
ARC2001-248

In the early 1980s the Taranaki Museum produced series of five facsimiles of public notices from the Taranaki Provincial Council collection held in the archive.
Accession No
ARC2001-266

During the Taranaki War, there were about 700 of the 65th Regiment, including the Headquarters, in Taranaki. Various companies of the regiment took part in nearly every battle and numerous skirmishes in Taranaki 1860-61 notably: Te Kohia (or L pa), 17 March, 1860, Kaihihi River, 9 October, 1860, Mahoetahi, 6 November, 1860 , Huirangi, 23 January, 1861 and Te Arei Pa, 2 February - 19 March, 1861. By 30 April, 1861, the entire Regiment was concentrated in the Albert Barracks, Auckland, except for 84 men in Taranaki.
On 4 May 1863, a detached company was involved in the assault of Katikara Pa, Taranaki. The Taranaki detachment finally rejoined the Regiment in Auckland in June, 1863.
The records comprise: Brigade and Garrison Order Book, March - October 1860; a Garrison Order Book, July 1865 - December 1866 and a Garrison Order Book, Camp Waitara, 1860 with letters between Captain James Barton and local Maori Chiefs, 1854-1860.
Accession No
ARC2001-364

On the 11 August 1855, the Taranaki Militia was sworn in, this remained as a force in name only until 1858 when the Taranaki Volunteer Rifle Corps was formed.
The records of colonial troops as listed in the in the collection comprises five order books, 1861-64, including regimental orders, duties and details and a regimental order book, 1865-66, with description rolls, stores, issues etc. of Number 4 (Capt. Newlands) Company, East Coast Expeditionary Force.
Three letterbooks, 1858-1881, are of outwards letters and one record book is of the Armed Constabulary and Volunteer Corps, inwards correspondence 1872-74. The records also include a diary, 1861-63, of duty allocations, leave and rations; a subscription book of the Soldiers Friend Society, 1860-67; roll and ration book, 1863-64 - with the diary of George Jupp, 1890-91, superimposed throughout; the rolls of No.1 Coy Bushrangers; No.1 Coy TRV, 1864, and No.2 Coy Waitara Contingent, 1865; the journal of the officer-in-charge (Captain Walter Morrison) of the Bell Block (Hua) Stockade, 11 July - 14 December 1860, including a day-to-day account and lists of crimes and offenders, and a detail and duty book, 1864.
Accession No
ARC2001-359

A memoranda book dealing with applications made by settlers in the greater New Plymouth area to the Taranaki Provincial Council Relief Fund for supplies, passage, rations and housing during the period 1860-61. Applications for payment for development and repairs to roads are also included. The applications include the names of residents living in the area.
Accession No
ARC2001-377

As a result of the decision to erect a memorial to Imperial and Colonial forces who fought and died in during the Maori Wars, the Marsland Hill Memorial Committee was formed in 1906. The task set before the committee was to decide on the type, site and costing of the memorial and to set in motion a fund raising scheme to finance the plans. The monument, a statue of a man in the uniform of the Armed Constabulary, was erected in 1909.
The statute was severely damaged on Waitangi Day 1991 and removed from the park.
The papers record the official minutes, newspaper clippings and accounts related to the Marsland Hill Memorial Committee, 1906 to 1909
Accession No
ARC2001-379
Loading...